Pastry Cream

There are so many types of creams that can be confusing! In this article there are some definitions that should help you out understand better the difference between pastry cream and other types of cream.

Chantilly Cream

Chantilly cream is just about the same as whipped cream, but sweeter and has vanilla taste. Originally, the Chantilly name came from the town of Chantilly in the northern region of France.

Clotted Cream

Clotted cream is a traditional British topping. It is made with full fat cow’s milk or heavy cream. It is heated for hours until it thickens or clots. In fact, the butterfat percentage is about 50. This cream is usually served with scones along with some jam. Indeed it is like a cream with a very high fat.

Half and Half

It is equal parts of heavy cream and whole milk. It can be used in coffee, ice cream, Panna Cotta and also in cooking.

Heavy Cream

In Australia, heavy cream is commonly known as thickened cream. Both of them contain similar milk fat content percentages and are interchangeable in recipes.

heavy cream is usually sold as ‘whipping cream’.

The heavy cream (thickened cream) contains between 35-40 percent milk fat. As it holds its shape after whipping it used for cake decoration and as the filling for pastries.

Pastry Cream (Creme Patisserie)

Pastry Cream is not a cream in fact. It is a rich and creamy custard thickened with starch and eggs. It plays a key role in many desserts and pastries and mainly used for filling eclairs, cream puffs, cakes like Boston cream pie, donuts and tarts. Basically,  it is flavoured with vanilla but feel free to add any other flavours instead. You can also change the texture of pastry cream and make it into diplomat cream or mousseline cream.

Diplomat cream is just vanilla pastry cream lightened with whipped cream.

Mousseline cream is a combination of pastry cream with softened butter.

Pasty cream can be kept in the refrigerator for up to 7 days.

 

Leave a Reply